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I-6 Engines For GMCs that came with the Inline 6 Engines

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  #1  
Old August 28th, 2013, 04:32 AM
Vern Vern is offline
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Default Help for a new guy

Hello, new member and aspirational 1966 GMC owner. Realization of dream I've has since I was a kid. Anyway, I'm looking at a 1966 GMC "custom" edition with a non-original inline 6 for $1500. The tags expired in 2001 and it's been sitting for the last 2-4 yrs. When I started it, it ran really rough and stalled when I pushed the choke in. Smelled horrible. I was able to drive it around the neighborhood, but had to leave the choke on. I came back a couple days later to drive it again; it started easier and ran a little better. However, I couldn't get it over 35 MPH on the road without it lurching and stalling multiple times. I would've bought it that night if I thought it had to be the potential to be a daily driver.
So my question is....I'd take it if the problem was simply old gas or something simple. I don't have the time, money, or expertise to deal with a complex problem. Are there some tests I can to do determine if it's a simple problem or a truck I should walk away from? Much appreciated!
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Old August 28th, 2013, 06:05 PM
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FetchMeAPepsi FetchMeAPepsi is offline
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

My guess is that it has sat long enough to gel up the gas. You'll probably need new gas, a carb rebuild (very simple weekend project), and new fuel filters. If it's really nasty gas you might have problems with the sending unit too. That's the thing that tells you how much gas is in the tank. It's another easy replacement though.

The great thing about these old trucks is that you can fix them with about 8 tools. And if you need help with it there's 500 people on this site. Chances are pretty high one of em knows how to do what youre wantin to do.
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  #3  
Old August 29th, 2013, 06:05 AM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vern View Post
Are there some tests I can to do determine if it's a simple problem or a truck I should walk away from?
Disconnect the inlet line from the fuel pump. Attach a length of hose to the inlet port and stick the other end in a can of fresh gas. If the engine runs better now, you know what the problem was. If the carb is gorped up badly enough, you may still need to clean it out, especially all the small passages, before the engine will run normally.

Ray
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Old August 29th, 2013, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

My guess is that it has sat long enough to gel up the gas. You'll probably need new gas, a carb rebuild (very simple weekend project), and new fuel filters. If it's really nasty gas you might have problems with the sending unit too. That's the thing that tells you how much gas is in the tank. It's another easy replacement though.

The great thing about these old trucks is that you can fix them with about 8 tools. And if you need help with it there's 500 people on this site. Chances are pretty high one of em knows how to do what youre wantin to do.[/QUOTE]

>>>The fuel gauge is stuck past full so that's another potential clue I guess. Thanks for your help!
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Old August 29th, 2013, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

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Originally Posted by FetchMeAPepsi View Post
My guess is that it has sat long enough to gel up the gas. You'll probably need new gas, a carb rebuild (very simple weekend project), and new fuel filters. If it's really nasty gas you might have problems with the sending unit too. That's the thing that tells you how much gas is in the tank. It's another easy replacement though.

The great thing about these old trucks is that you can fix them with about 8 tools. And if you need help with it there's 500 people on this site. Chances are pretty high one of em knows how to do what youre wantin to do.
>>>Ray and pepsi, great ideas and thanks for the posts. What would you folks do next? I was thinking about adding some fuel stabilizer to the old remaining gas then adding some fresh ethanol-free gas to the tank. Maybe a new fuel filter. I'd like it to be able to run >50 MPH to get it home where I can do some more TLC like rebuild the carb and replace the plugs?
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Old August 29th, 2013, 07:39 PM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

I wouldn't drive it that fast being that it's a new to you truck. Maybe 40-45 max downhill with my buttcheeks pinched together but that's me. I'm risk averse lol.

If it was me my next step Id trailer her home or drive her slow (30-35 mph) with my wife or a friend following me to make sure I made it. Carry some tools for simple repairs like screwdrivers (both kinds) needle nose pliers, a set of wrenches, and a belt for the engine or some pantyhose from the wife. And a couple of gallons of distilled water in case she overheats. And a quart or two of oil. You never know on a new-to-you truck or car. Part of the fun is finding the trouble and fixin it

Then Id get a pump and pump all the old gas out into a gas can. Dispose of as you think you should.

Then Id bang on it a few times with my hand (not a metal hammer or a road flare ). Aim at that big round bolted in spot in the middle to see if you can knock the sending unit loose. If you can get it to fall down it might work great after that and a new batch of gas. If you hear it moving around it might be the gauge that's bad or dirty. Dirty is an easy fix if you're careful. If you wait a few days to air out you can safely undo all those bolts and just pull the sending unit out and soak it in carb cleaner if it's not moving freely.

Finally I'd replace both gas filters if you have both. One under the cab and one by the carb. After that it's off to Napa for a carb rebuild kit. Take a weekend and take your time. She'll probably run without it but you'll end up doing it anyway soon and its only 15 bucks. Best 15 bucks I ever spent on Cecilia.

Congrats on your new truck! Where are the pictures




Oh I forgot to add if you turn the key off and the gas gauge doesnt move its probably electrical. It can be both though.
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  #7  
Old August 30th, 2013, 01:41 AM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

Good advice to follow from these guys. I would try a clear plastic fuel filter between the pump and carb too and keep an eye on it to see if a lot of debris collect in it. Rust or dirt from the fuel tank will be visible.

In 2009 I got a '55 GMC with a '66-'68ish Chevy 230 in it and the truck had been sitting in a field for 14 years prior to that. I was very fortunate the tank was clean and was able to drive it home like Fetch recommended while my wife followed. I rebuilt the carb and the fuel pump arm was broken but stroking enough to get a little gas. Replaced it. That was just to get it home. It has been my daily driver since 2011 when the title mess finally got cleared up and an aweful lot more time and work has been put into it but not a lot of money.

My point is you asked if you should walk away from it. That is a hard question because it depends on desire to work and learn because there will be work to do, but it can be done yourself. If you want something you could just fix the carb and start driving, problem free, this probably isn't going to work out that well as there is always something that will arise while driving an old truck! The more you can do yourself, the less you will spend.

Later---DAC
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  #8  
Old August 30th, 2013, 04:26 AM
Vern Vern is offline
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

Thanks, folks. I haven't bought it yet (the guy selling it went on vacation, so I have some time to think about it). If I do, I'll definitely post. I guess if I trailer it home, maybe I can give the guy to give me a break on the $1500!
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Old August 30th, 2013, 08:14 AM
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vern View Post
Hello, new member and aspirational 1966 GMC owner. Realization of dream I've has since I was a kid. Anyway, I'm looking at a 1966 GMC "custom" edition with a non-original inline 6 for $1500. The tags expired in 2001 and it's been sitting for the last 2-4 yrs. When I started it, it ran really rough and stalled when I pushed the choke in. Smelled horrible. I was able to drive it around the neighborhood, but had to leave the choke on. I came back a couple days later to drive it again; it started easier and ran a little better. However, I couldn't get it over 35 MPH on the road without it lurching and stalling multiple times. I would've bought it that night if I thought it had to be the potential to be a daily driver.
So my question is....I'd take it if the problem was simply old gas or something simple. I don't have the time, money, or expertise to deal with a complex problem. Are there some tests I can to do determine if it's a simple problem or a truck I should walk away from? Much appreciated!
My first question isn't about how it runs cause that's just a bonus. Nothing on these trucks is to complicated or expensive to repair if you have basic skills and a forum like this to help out on things you don't already know.
My first question is what shape is the body in? If that's good, complete with tailgate, then that alone is worth over $1500, as body work and rust repairs wiould cost a lot more than that.
Everyone here is right, you give her a fresh gas load (maybe a tune-up & carb job) and away she'll go! GOOD LUCK!
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Old August 30th, 2013, 02:49 PM
Vern Vern is offline
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Default Re: Help for a new guy

It has the rust spots behind the front wheels that they all seem to have if not restored previously. I think the fenders are relatively easy to replace. There is one bad spot over the left rear wheel on the box, but looks like it can be repaired. The wood on the bed is in pretty bad shape, but that too can be replaced. Other than that, the rest is pretty solid. A pic is attached. Thanks for the help!
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